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Dorset Naga chilli

20 Jul

For yesterday’s dinner I had some Lincolnshire sausages left from a barbecue so I thought I’d make a hot sauce and have them with some pasta. On a recent trip to Tesco I’d stocked up on chillies, getting a couple of packs of the usual ‘red chillies’ which I believe to be Cayenne, some Bird’s Eye chillies and some I’d not seen before, the Dorset Naga. Now bearing in mind I eat quite a lot of chillies I think I can handle most of them. Having had a 7-pot chilli before and not having died I thought nothing more of it. Here is another Dorset Naga from the pack:

Dorset Naga chilli

My sauce contained two sliced onions, a cayenne, a bird’s eye and a Dorset Naga, some cumin, 3 cloves of garlic (crushed), some coriander seeds, some black pepper and a tub of passata. It was at this point I read the packaging and noticed that Tesco had labelled this with 6 chillies out of a possible 5 (!?) on their heat scale. I had to eat a slice. Well that was an experience that I would not recommend to the non-chilli-tolerant.

I had my dinner, pasta, sausages and three tablespoons full of my sauce. I actually needed a shower afterwards-no light glow on the cheekbones from this meal! Upon further reading, the Dorset Naga has been measured in at 1.6 million Scoville Heat Units, which I believe makes it the hottest chilli known to man. Bear in mind that the pure chemical responsible for the burn, capsaicin, measures at 16 million SHU, only ten times more…

 
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  1. Simon

    2011/07/20 at 03:40

    Bloody hell Dave! That sounded like pretty tasty sauce to me… until you mentioned the Scoville rating of the Dorset Naga! I shall know to avoid chopping one of those up to add an extra dimension to the next lasagne… Thank you for this valuable public warning message. 😀

     
    • Dave

      2011/07/21 at 01:35

      Seriously, if you aren’t used to HOT chillies then stay the hell away from these. I can eat the cayenne like grapes but these really could be dangerous to those not used to them.

      I recommend checking out the Scoville ratings on actual pepper spray to get some idea of how strong these really are.

      Having bought the 7-pot chilli (a similar strength) from a chilli aficionado at Riverside Market before, and receiving a STRONGLY worded warning and basically, a disclaimer, in case I actually ended up injuring myself, I would properly consider this before even touching these without gloves.

      This is not just a fruit; this kind of strength would likely be covered by the Chemical Weapons Convention if weaponised.

       
  2. Ben

    2011/08/01 at 11:11

    You for these chilies in Tesco, you say?

     
    • Dave

      2011/08/01 at 16:09

      Yup. Fancy your chances do you Ben?